Hijacking Hotspots: Most targeted cars and bakkies in SA

  • February 09, 2017 | Article courtesy of Wheels24 & Extracts from ADT and National Hijack Prevention Academy

We are often asked by clients for advise when buying cars as to which vehicles to steer clear of due to hijacking or theft risk. Unfortunately we live in a country where any type of vehicle can be stolen or hijacked at any time and no vehicle is immune from this type of incident, however there are definitely some makes of vehicles that appear to be targeted by criminals more frequently.  

C-Track, Arrive Alive & Pro-Active South have complied and released some interesting statistics of the worst affected vehicles and areas in South Africa. It is no surprise that VW Polo's, followed closely by Toyota and Ford, are the most popular passenger vehicles targets by criminal. Toyota Fortuners being the most popular SUV style vehicle and Toyota Hiluxes top the list of the most popular bakkie stolen. To view the full statistics, click on the full article below:

READ: Hijacking Hotspots: Most targeted cars, bakkies in SA

READ: Hijacking Hotspots in SA, Johannesburg, Pretoria, Cape Town & Durban

At Barker Insurance, we dont turn a blind eye to this type of information, and make it a top priority to protect our clients vehicles. We have identified these high risk vehicles, and along with Beame, our preferred tracking device, we are ensuring that all these vehicles are protected. For these high risk vehicles, we are in fact fitting Double Beame devices at a Barker special price of R99 per vehicle per month for two tracking systems, allowing a double chance of getting your vehicle back. Should you wish to convert your vehicle tracking to Beame or have an additional device installed, please contact your Barker consultant to make arrangements for you.

ADT in association with the National Hijack Prevention Academy have put together some helpful safety tips on how to avoid being hijacked:

  • Be particularly vigilant when you leave a shopping centre. Hijackers could have spotters working in the centre to alert them of any big purchases or cash withdrawals.
  • If you suspect you are being followed, indicate to turn then slow down at least two to three houses prior to your home. This will force the motorist behind you to overtake and this could cause criminals to lose interest.
  • If you need to stop in your driveway to manually open the gate, always leave the key in the ignition and the motor running unless you have a child in the car. Only then should you take the key with you as you open the gate. The key is a valuable negotiating tool – they want your car and you want your child.
  • Always make sure you can see the back wheels of the car in front of you when you stop in traffic. This gives you enough room to manoeuvre should you be boxed in.
  • Don’t fall for the “tap tap” trap in which a driver slightly bumps the back of your car in traffic. Hijackers often use lady drivers as decoys here. Don’t get out of your car to assess the damage but rather signal to the other driver to follow you then drive to a busy location. If this is a scam, they will seldom follow you.
  • If you stay in a secure complex with security guards, do not be fooled into thinking you are safe. You can easily be followed into your complex so always remain vigilant. Research shows most people relax the closer they get to home and this is often when they are most vulnerable.

In the unlikely event of a hijacking:

  • The golden rule is to not antagonise the hijackers. You need to show them you are not a threat. Lift up your arms to show you have no weapon and will surrender. Use your left arm to undo your seat belt and put your car in neutral.
  • Leave the motor running and get out slowly. Try and angle your body sideways so you are not facing a firearm head-on. Avoid eye contact with the hijackers but try to take in as much information you can use to identity them. Most importantly try to remain calm
  • Dont be a hero, let the tracking company recover your vehicle. Your life is more important.
blog comments powered by Disqus